An intresting Music industery thing that needs to change.

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Joeyshoelace
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So I'd just like to share a little post on a site that kinda goes in how atrocious the credit system is and how its getting harder for guys like me to gain credit for our work.
http://www.digitalmusicnews.com/permalink/2012/120420credits

great things can happen in the digital world I'll admit, but people should credit others for working on project's. I've been robbed of many credits in my past due to this current lack of digital credit. so I obviously have some attachment to the subject manner. but I ask is it really much to ask for an engineer or who ever did work on an album to have their name easily acquired?

anyway love to hear some thoughts on it. you agree someone that does what I do should have their name on stuff in the digital world? or am I just nuts and have no right to demand some kind of document saying I Mixed a song?

GeN2Mo
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Seeing how much producers and sound engineers can change the sound and feel of an album, I think they should always be mentioned. They may not be part of the band but they are part of an album just as much as everyone else. It's not like an album where the band performs awesome but the producer did a reallly bad job will attract many ears, is it?
Just consider: How completely absurd would it be to not mention Rhys Fulber as producer on all the early Fear Factory releases. He pretty much made this band what it is today just as much as Cazares or Bell did.

No really, extensive credits should be a must.

wanzwa
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If credits are an issue to you, then you should be clear about production credits upfront and or get it on a contract with the band members before doing the work. Having been robbed of production credits myself, by visitors to this site no less, I doubt it's less of a personal thing and more of the fact bands that are suffering trying to get their name out there and that your value to the music world just isn't something they care about next to their own-- which doesn't change the impact of your work, or the sound it made on their record. But professionally, 'but but but he said would' arguments can all be cut out by mutually agreeing on something then signing it to paper beforehand.

Album/song credits should just honestly reflect what work was actually put into the media. If you want to be credited as the producer, make sure you're actually producing something. If I were working strictly as a musician under the direction of a producer, that producer's skill, quality, and role come into definite question being on the album. There's a big trend in music that simply by owning equipment one thinks himself a producer... "You used my facilities, I get credit". If this is how you did things, we'd credit you as "Recorded at X Studios" or whatever. But on the other hand, if we come to you and you totally revamp our album, music, sound, etc, then you are a producer of our music having taken an active role in the whole music process rather than passively grouping things together at the end.

Not that that's the issue you've pointed out, just what I think a kind of common situation that may lead to bands not crediting their help.

You could avoid the whole situation though just by being both the musicians and the producer... lol spam Wink..

Regardless if the band acknowledges your work, you should still just include uncredited work in your portfolio, and before and after samples of your improvements, if possible. Even then, a band not mentioning you is different from lying and saying you had nothing to do with the work. I just know these situations are best handled prior to doing the work.

Joeyshoelace
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its not so much that a band wont credit me but rather with how things are with everything going to a digital format people are no longer getting credits in the sense that its near imposable to see who the people behind the scenes are cause people no longer have a cd book to look at with all the names that worked on the album.

I my self make it clear before I do anything that I want the credit. but when I know something is getting released digitally back of my head just thinks there is no point in having it cause there is no way for people to see it. unless the band practically bragged that they worked with so and so on their album.

but you raise a valid point that beginners of doing this kind of work can learn from without living it. make sure you get that credit and that the band knows you want that credit before you even start.