Max Karon - Will to Exist review

Max Karon - Will To Exist [Full-length]
February 8, 2012 - Self-released
9

Max Karon is a music producer and audio engineer, releasing his self-created instrumental debut entitled 'Will To Exist' under his own name, yet cultivating the eventual agenda to form a real deal band to play this music - with vocals - on live shows in the future. Once you read this review, I hereby urge you to visit Max's Facebook page to check out the music for yourself, but, if you are a musician yourself, then there is another reason to do so, as well: Max Karon is looking for vocalists, and plans to re-release the album with - illogical. surprise. - vocals on it. So, here is the deal: once you start to listen to this instrumental progressive djent monster of an LP, you should always be aware that the fabric of the music has been manufactured with the dormant propensity of vocals being added to it at a later date. Needless to say, finding the flow and the words for the music is an interesting challenge for anyone feeling capable to summon such thoughts and energies. If you think you reign among those individuals, now is your time to prove a point. Guys, let's talk about the music.

Max Karon's debut won't hesitate all that much with knocking you flat on your butt, as the album virtually exhibits no weaknesses as it addresses its flamboyant fascinations on pretty much full cybernetic high octane efficiency throughout its equally rewarding and equally demanding full spin time. The compositions are rabid, mean, extremely intricately varied; repetitions are virtually non-existent on the debut, so it is safe to say that its complexity is surpassed only by the clinically insane, and conform all the way to the recent epitome, to the recent primordial character of Meshuggah metal, though it remains interesting to see what kind of music Meshuggah will bring down on consensus with their freshest entry 'Koloss', that is expected to be delivered in March, this year.

Max Karon's debut LP demands steep recognition, as it is pretty evident - tautology - that there is tremendous musical thought and work behind the delivery, and, as easy it is to write such a sentence, so rewarding it is to be convinced of the related truth of it, via subjecting yourself to the stimuli by earpower. The respective fabrics of the tracks tend to reveal both djenty and progressive approach throughout the structures, and the main complementary tool being utilized by Max is to throw in nice high frequency guitars here and there with an ambient character to them. These background solos, thank God & Co., are exhibiting more of an ornamental role in the flow than a safety zone notes can be minigunned from towards wankfestland. The djenting does the minigun thing, no problem.

The production is massive, as it sounds like Max Karon is seeking for the most dangerous gravitational sonic pull all the time. In other words, the album finds profound pleasure by exhibiting segments with extremely heavy dosages of thick sounds parked in them, doing all this without ending up in a chaotic catastrophe. The clarity of Thought, the clarity of the Pattern both are revered and approached to as Sacred, and never harmed during the debut. As result of these central defining factors, the release registers and weighs in vastly superior to recent day shameless commercial exploitations of the djent sub-genre. It always is nice to see a diligent, heartfelt take on something, and this is nothing less than that. As such, I will wrap this review up and urge you to check out the debut, as it is in the need of listeners.